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PLANT PROFILE LIST

      Red Mulberry (Morus rubra) leaves 

NAME: Black Mulberry

SPECIES / FAMILY:  Morus Nigra / Moraceae

OTHER COMMON NAME(S): 

CONDITIONS: sun-partial shade
 

PARTS:

EDIBLE cid:image001.jpg@01D3EC3E.A305A520

TASTE

RAW/COOK

SEASON

All

 

 

 

 

Shoots

 

 

 

 

Leaves

       

Stalk/Stem

 

 

 

 

Buds

       

Flowers

 

 

 

 

Fruits

sweet

RAW/DRY/COOK

Jun

Pods

 

 

   

Seeds

 

 

 

 

Nuts

 

 

 

 

Roots

 

 

 

 

Bark

 

 

 

 

 

PORTION: small-medium

 

SIMILAR SPECIES: white (from Asia) and red (native) mulberry trees

 

COMMENT: Tree is self-fertile, has both male and female parts found mainly in the South, origins unknown. //  Mulberries are my favorite fruit as the berries are very sweet, plus the trees are easy to grow and not prone to disease. Mulberry trees should be a staple in any yard or neighborhood. The fruit is very sweet and delicious if picked "fully ripe", meaning when it is slightly soft to the touch. Fruit can be eaten raw, cooked, dried, and used in any manner. // A delicious slightly acid flavour (this editor does not agree with the acid comment, finds them very sweet), it makes an excellent dessert fruit and can be eaten in quantity.The fruit falls from the tree as soon as it is fully ripe. It is best, therefore, to grow the tree in short grass to cushion the fall of the fruit but to still make it possible to find and harvest. The fruit can also be dried and ground into a powder.(1) Mulberry trees are sometimes related to fig and paper mulberry, but those designations can change.

 

CAUTION: Eat only fully ripe berries.


NUTRITION/MEDICINAL:  Anthelmintic;  Astringent;  Homeopathy;  Hypoglycaemic;  Laxative;  Odontalgic;  Purgative.(1

LOOK-A-LIKES:  

 

POISONOUS LOOK-A-LIKES: 

 

OTHER USES: Dye;  Fibre;  Wood. A fibre used in weaving is obtained from the bark. A red-violet to dark purple dye is obtained from the fruit. A yellow-green dye is obtained from the leaves. Wood - used in joinery.(1)

 

SOURCE LINKS (may include nutritional and medicinal info, plus other uses):

  1. https://pfaf.org/user/plant.aspx?latinname=Morus+nigra
  2. http://www.eattheweeds.com/mulberry-glucose-controlling-hallucinogen-2
  3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morus_nigra
  4. http://www.foragingtexas.com/2008/08/mulberry.html  (good photos)
  5. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Morus_nigra (good photos)
  6. https://food52.com/blog/13462-mulberries-the-fruit-that-s-probably-growing-in-your-yard-right-now
  7. https://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/foraging-mulberries-and-a-recipe-for-mulberry-chutney-zbcz1605  (recipe)
  8. https://www.healthygreensavvy.com/mulberry-recipes (recipe)
  9. https://www.moruslondinium.org/recipes (recipe)
  10. http://the3foragers.blogspot.com/2012/06/mulberry-recipe-mulberry-jam.html (recipe)
  11. http://magicalchildhood.com/life/2015/09/09/10-delicious-ways-to-use-mulberries  (recipe)
  12. https://willforageforfood.com/index.php/2017/06/15/seasonal-recipe-mulberry-vinegar (recipe)
  13. http://www.pennilessparenting.com/2016/05/foraged-wild-mulberry-syrup-recipe.html (recipe)