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PLANT PROFILE LIST
 

hosta shoots  Hosta Bressingham Blue.JPG   

 

NAME: Hosta

LATIN NAME / FAMILY:  Hosta / Funkiaceae

OTHER COMMON NAME(S):  Plantain Lily

CONDITIONS: partial shade
 

PARTS:

EDIBLE cid:image001.jpg@01D3EC3E.A305A520

TASTE

RAW/COOK

SEASON

All

 

 

 

 

Shoots

 cid:image001.jpg@01D3EC3E.A305A520

 green bean

 COOK

 Spring

Leaves

cid:image001.jpg@01D3EC3E.A305A520

 green bean COOK Summer

Stalk/Stem

 

 

 

 

Buds

 

     

Flowers

 

 

 

 

Fruits

 

 

 

 

Pods

 

 

   

Seeds

 

 

 

 

Nuts

 

 

 

 

Roots

 

 

 

 

Bark

 

 

 

 

 

PORTION: small-medium

 

COMMENT:  PFAF says only to cook young leaves and leaf stems, but other sources say that buds and flowers can be also eaten raw or cooked.  Hostas can be used as Nature's Taco Shell when leaves are fully unfurled. Hosta is our exception to the Wild rule. Most hostas in US are cultivars, but they are all edible, although with different flavors and textures. Hostas introduce people to the concept that there are lots of plants in your garden that may be edible. // Today, the plant is sold as Urui, and the shoots, leaves and flowers are all edible.  The soft texture and mild, less bitter flavor of young shoots is preferred to older growth.  It is best to harvest leaves in the morning, when they have the highest moisture content.  They can be eaten raw or cooked (boiled) and I have seen descriptions of taste which include snow pea pods, asparagus, lettuce and spinach.  Snipping the blooms may seem gruesome to some hosta fanatics, but the flowers are also edible and can be used to beautify your salad or featured as a cake decoration. Although all species appear to be edible, H. montana and H. sieboldii are the most common vegetable favorites, while H. plantaginea is preferred for the sweet delicacy of flower consumption.  An interesting aside, the Chinese frequently plant fields of H. plantaginea for honey production. (4)

 

CAUTION: PFAF says only to cook young leaves and leaf stems, but other sources say that buds and flowers can be also eaten raw or cooked.  

 

NUTRITION/MEDICINAL:  https://www.webmd.com / https://draxe.com/

 

LOOK-A-LIKES:  

 

POISONOUS LOOK-A-LIKES: 

 

OTHER USES:

 

SOURCE LINKS (may include nutritional and medicinal info, plus other uses):

  1. https://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Hosta+species
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hosta
  3. http://www.foragingtexas.com/2012/05/hostas.html  (good photos)
  4. https://www.hostasdirect.com/blog/hostas-are-edible
  5. https://practicalselfreliance.com/edible-hostas (recipe)
  6. https://foragerchef.com/eating-hosta-shoots (recipe)
  7. https://scottishforestgarden.wordpress.com/2012/05/07/hostas (recipe)
  8. https://druidgarden.wordpress.com/tag/hosta-recipes  (recipe)
  9. https://www.backyardforager.com/roasted-hosta-shoots-recipe  (recipe)
  10. https://www.syracuse.com/food/2017/05/how_to_cook_hostas_yes_you_read_that_right.html  (recipe)
  11. https://www.mnn.com/food/healthy-eating/blogs/hosta-shoots-are-edible  (recipe)
  12. https://www.backyardforager.com/roasted-hosta-shoots-recipe
     

CULINARY SPECIES or CHEF PREFERENCES: