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Robinia acacia 'frisia' JPG.jpg     

 

NAME: Black Locust

SPECIES / FAMILY:  Robinia Pseudoacacia / Fabaceae

OTHER COMMON NAME(S): 

CONDITIONS: full sun
 

PARTS:

EDIBLEcid:image001.jpg@01D3EC3E.A305A520

TASTE

RAW/COOK

SEASON

All

 

 

 

 

Shoots

 

 

 

 

Leaves

       

Stalk/Stem

 

 

 

 

Buds

       

Flowers

cid:image001.jpg@01D3EC3E.A305A520

sweet pea

raw/cook

May

Fruits

 

 

 

 

Pods

 

 

   

Seeds

 

 

 

 

Nuts

 

 

 

 

Roots

 

 

 

 

Bark

 

 

 

 

 

PORTION: small

 

COMMENT:  White flowers - cooked. A fragrant aroma, they are used in making jams and pancakes. They can also be made into a pleasant drink.(1) The entire flower portion is edible, with the pink base having the sweetest flavor. Once harvested, leave the bag open to allow the spiders you will invariably have captured to escape.  Black locust flowers taste surprisingly like the sweetest of sweet spring peas, but with a floral element as well. The texture of the bases is somewhat crunchy, like celery, but without any stringiness. They are a great snack to nibble on (after you have inspected them for bugs), and they are wonderful in salads.(3)

 

CAUTION: All parts of the plant (except the flowers) and especially the bark, should be considered to be toxic. The toxins are destroyed by heat.(1) Perhaps green seeds and pods

 

NUTRITION/MEDICINAL:  Protein, Minerals, Vitamins (1) Antispasmodic;  Antiviral;  Aromatic;  Cancer;  Cholagogue;  Diuretic;  Emetic;  Emollient;   Febrifuge;  Laxative;  Narcotic;  Purgative;  Tonic.(1)

 

LOOK-A-LIKES:  

 

POISONOUS LOOK-A-LIKES: 

 

OTHER USES: Dye;  Essential;  Fibre;  Fuel;  Oil;  Soil stabilization;  Wood.(1) Untreated black locust wood has many uses, and cut posts can even survive in the ground for over 100 years.

 

SOURCE LINKS (may include nutritional and medicinal info, plus other uses):

  1. https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Robinia+pseudoacacia
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robinia_pseudoacacia
http://foragedfoodie.blogspot.com/2013/05/foraging-identifying-harvesting-black.html (good photos)